Angie Meza

Angie Meza

Pflugerville, Texas

In November 2003, Angie’s daughter Monica, age 4, developed a fever. Angie took her to their pediatrician, where she was diagnosed with the flu. Monica was prescribed an antiviral and cough medicine. The following day, Angie brought Monica back to the pediatrician because her condition worsened. The pediatrician discovered Monica was having problems breathing and had a low blood oxygen level. The breathing machine the pediatrician wanted to treat her with was broken, so he sent Angie and Monica next door to the hospital.

The doctor in the ER diagnosed Monica with pneumonia and gave her the breathing treatment she needed. After the breathing treatment, her blood oxygen level stabilized. Since she was four years old, they transferred her to a children’s hospital for observation.

At the children’s hospital, they put her in the ICU so she could be on a ventilator as a preventive measure. After being placed on the ventilator, Angie was told that the doctors wanted to insert a line in a blood vessel near her clavicle to administer medication more easily. The procedure was described as routine and Angie was only notified of insignificant risks associated with the procedure.

Angie and her husband Eddie waited outside and became worried because the procedure was taking longer than had been described. After 45 minutes, the doctor came out and told her there was a problem inserting the line and that she had punctured a blood vessel which was now bleeding out excessively into her right lung. A half dozen doctors worked overnight trying to stabilize her. Later on, Angie discovered from the medical records that Monica had to be revived several times during the night. In the morning she was in critical condition and her immune system had shut down.

Monica was labeled with a rare syndrome and was treated with chemotherapy for the next 16 days. A respiratory technician did not follow the directions specified in Monica’s chart and in doing so, ruptured her throat. This final accident was too much for her little body to bear and Angie and Eddie were forced to let her go. Angie has been unable to find a lawyer to take her case and still does not know all the details surrounding her child’s death.

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