Texas Watch

Safety

Safety

As our state’s economy thrives and our population booms, Texas families and communities face new threats to their physical and financial safety. On the road, on the job, and in the home, Texans are looking for meaningful protections and strong accountability measures. So, priority one for lawmakers should be to adopt common sense steps to put the safety of Texas families and small business owners first.

Fight for a Safe Texas

The freedom to raise a family, build a business, and thrive in the Texas economy is only possible if our citizens’ physical and financial safety is protected. Tell your legislator to put families and businesses first by adopting common sense policies that protect our roads, homes, and businesses.

Latest from Safety

  • The 85th Legislative Session

    Thursday, January 12, 2017

    The 85th Legislative Session is here and we’re ready for the fight. We’re ready to make a stand to preserve policyholder protections, make our roads safer, and protect consumers.

    Thanks to your support last session, we were able to beat back insurance lobbyists’ efforts to rob Texas policyholders of their vital legal protections. Now, insurance lobbyists are coming back for your rights.

  • Statement on ATF Findings in West Fertilizer Fire

    Wednesday, May 11, 2016

    Alex Winslow, executive director of Texas Watch, released the following statement:

    The ATF held a press conference today speculating that the fire at the West fertilizer plant was a criminal act. They offered no scientific evidence for their conclusion, only that they claim to have ruled out other possible causes. Today’s media event did little to clear up the confusion about the events leading up to the fire at the West plant three years ago.

  • Report: Texas Hasn't Done Enough since West Explosion

    Thursday, February 25, 2016

    West, Texas, 2013—a fertilizer plant explodes, injuring over 260 and killing 15, most of whom were first responders on the site. The blast was among the most destructive ever investigated by the U.S.. Chemical Safety Board. 

    Three years later, only a few attempts have been made to prevent another explosion. Attempts that a report released by the Chemical Safety Board last month called "inadequate."